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The laboratory investigates how the environment modifies epigenetic mechanisms, and how epigenetics is related to disease outcomes. Epigenetics, a currently hot topic, is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in the DNA sequence. The laboratory has undertaken pioneering DNA methylation work, examining the effects of a wide range of environmental agents, including air pollution, heavy metals, and organic chemicals. More recently, we have started an investigation on plasmatic extracellular vesicles and microRNAs, aimed at evaluating their role in mediating cardiovascular and respiratory effects of air pollution.

EPIGET: Epidemiology, Epigenetics and Toxicology GROUP

Our lab is part of the EPIGET group. The EPIGET mission is to put together our expertise in exposure assessment, such as extensive know-how in toxicology, molecular epidemiology, statistics and chemistry.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health

The Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health (DISCCO - DIpartimento di Scienze Cliniche e di COmunitĂ ) was established in April 2012 with the aim to continue the spirit and the legacy, and innovate the health care and scientific activities, of some of the most renowned health institutions within the city of Milan, Italy.

The DISCCO main research units are active in the field of internal medicine, cardiovascular sciences, maternal-infant care, surgical specialties, occupational and environmental medicine, medical statistics and epidemiology, and other specific medical sciences. DISCCO has been designed as an integrated multidisciplinary organization where cooperation among researchers with different background and expertise (from biological and biotechnological-translational science to clinical sciences to community medicine and public health) may enable to achieve remarkable goals in the field of applied research for the health of individual persons and of the population at large. http://eng.discco.unimi.it/ecm/home