Category Archives: Visiting

Stefano Pirandola talk at AQM

We are glad to announce that Stefano Pirandola (University of York) will deliver a talk on Tuesday 14 July at the Aula di Ottica Quantistica (5th floor LITA building). An abstract of the talk follows.

Stefano Pirandola (University of York)

Relay-based protocols in correlated-noise Gaussian environments

We consider continuous-variable protocols exploiting a quantum relay, such as entanglement swapping, quantum teleportation, and QKD. Their theory is extended to a non-Markovian spatial model of decoherence characterized by correlated Gaussian noise. Even if bipartite entanglement is completely lost at the relay, we show that the various protocols can progressively be reactivated by the separable noise-correlations of the environment.

Elsi-Mari Laine and Massimo Borrelli visiting AQM

Elsi-Mari Laine and Massimo Borrelli from the University of Turku (Finland) will visit us from Monday 13 to Friday 17 July.

They will deliver two talks on Wednesday 15 July.

Room: Aula di Ottica Quantistica (5th floor LITA building)

17:00: Elsi-Mari Laine (University of Turku)

“Dynamics of incompatibility of quantum measurements in open systems”

The non-classical nature of quantum states, whether depicted with entanglement or quantum discord, is often considered as resource for quantum information protocols. However, the non-classicality of a quantum system cannot be encapsulated as a property of the state alone, as the set of available measurements used to extract information on the system may also be restricted. In this work we study how the non-classicality of quantum measurements, quantified via their incompatibility, is influenced by quantum noise and, further, how a non-Markovian environment may help us in maintaining the measurement resources.

17:30: Massimo Borrelli (University of Turku)

“Quantum probing of complex systems”

Quantum probes are controllable quantum objects that can be used to investigate complex systems via tailored, engineered interactions. By monitoring the dynamics of the probe(s) one can directly access some of the complex system’s features, such as average quantities and correlations. In this talk we are going to give a brief introduction to quantum probes, with particular emphasis on the open-system approach. Furthermore, we are going to discuss a few examples of successful applications of quantum probing to many-body systems.